New Cool Poster Art 2014

 

Great new rare art posters for sale:

 

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Gallus, Grand Vin Apertif
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Dormeuse, c.1932
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Toscano Valley I
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1940 Coupe Salt Flat Racer
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Poppies
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Tour Ireland Connemira Mg…
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Frank Lloyd Wright, Falli…
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Wright Brothers Flight at Kitty Hawk
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Window to the Soul
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Pin-Up Girl: Hot Rod Leopard
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Orange Orchid
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The Night Scotsman
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Grand Prix Automobile Mee…
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Sun Salutation II
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Modiano
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Dormeuse, c.1932
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Tulip Fields at Sasenheim
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The Break of Dawn I
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Portrait of Adele Bloch-B…
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Showcase of Designs made with Cool Overprint Effects

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Classic printing techniques such as screen printing rely on old school techniques to mix inks to form a colourful design. One of those methods is to directly overprint two colours on top of each other as a subtractive mix to provide additional hues alongside the primary ink colours. Typically this effect is produced at the printing stage, but similar effects can be replicated digitally in Photoshop and Illustrator. This showcase features 30 fantastic designs where the classic overprint effect is prominently used, resulting in interesting blends of text and images.

Wolf & Lion by Joshua M. Smith

Wolf & Lion by Joshua M. Smith

Broad Strokes by Jamie Rickett

Broad Strokes by Jamie Rickett

Pirate Republic by Ryan Feerer

Pirate Republic by Ryan Feerer

Greeting Card by Make Good Things Happen

Greeting Card by Make Good Things Happen

Crawfish Boil by Ryan Harrison

Crawfish Boil by Ryan Harrison

Love & Creativity by Ryan Frease

Love & Creativity by Ryan Frease

Work / Play by iamalwayshungry

Work / Play by iamalwayshungry

Tick Tock Boom by Mitchell Thompson

Tick Tock Boom by Mitchell Thompson

I Have No Idea by JHEMINGTON

I Have No Idea by JHEMINGTON

Fake 82 by Mark Weaver

Fake 82 by Mark Weaver

Frightened Rabbit Poster by withayou

Frightened Rabbit Poster by withayou

Summit Brewing Co. by Aesthetic Apparatus

Summit Brewing Co. by Aesthetic Apparatus

Roman Candle by Doublenaut

Roman Candle by Doublenaut

Lover! Gig Poster by Mart Infanger

Lover! Gig Poster by Mart Infanger

Jack of Heart Gig Poster by Mart Infanger

Jack of Heart Gig Poster by Mart Infanger

The Feeling of Love by Mart Infanger

The Feeling of Love Gig Poster by Mart Infanger

Heirlooms Gig Poster by Brian Cook

Heirlooms Gig Poster by Brian Cook

Cute Lepers, Modern Pets by Fancy Art Club

Cute Lepers, Modern Pets by Fancy Art Club

Artcrank 2012 by Allan Peters

Artcrank 2012 by Allan Peters

Awesome Awesomeness by 55 Hi’s

Awesome Awesomeness by 55 Hi's

Never Let Me Go by Emory Allen

Never Let Me Go by Emory Allen

Bird Dog & Bird by strawberryluna

Bird Dog & Bird by strawberryluna

More we. Less tea by Northcoast Zeitgeist

More we. Less tea by Northcoast Zeitgeist

Josh Ritter by Shawn Hileman

Josh Ritter by Shawn Hileman

Mustard Overprint by Jonathan Schmitt

Mustard Overprint by Jonathan Schmitt

Shapes of Cities Screenprints by Yoni Alter

Shapes of Cities Screenprints by Yoni Alter

Knight by JooHee Yoon

Knight by JooHee Yoon

The post Showcase of Designs made with Cool Overprint Effects appeared first on Blog.SpoonGraphics.

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Why Modern Movie Poster Art Sucks

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Some great posters from 2013 (just my opinion, obviously):

All Is Lost
The Butler
The Conjuring
Escape From Tomorrow
Fast & Furious 6 (teasers)
Fruitvale Station
Gravity
Hell Baby
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (teaser)
The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (Imax)
Iron Man 3 (First full poster and Imax)
The Last Exorcism Part II
Oz the Great and Powerful (teaser)
The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (teaser)
The Wolverine (teasers)
World War Z (teaser)

MONDO DEBUTS A NEW ART POSTER FOR NBC’S HANNIBAL

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NBC’s psychological thriller series that premiered to over 4.3 million viewers follows FBI Agent Will Graham (Hugh Dancy) as he hunts the most notorious serial killers…But, little does he know that his new partner is the most infamous serial killer of them all.

Both a gift and a curse, Graham has the extraordinary ability to think like his prey—he sees what they see, feels what they feel. But while Graham is pursuing an especially troubling, cannibalistic murderer, Special Agent Jack Crawford teams him with a highly respected psychiatrist – a man with a taste for the criminal minded – Dr. Hannibal Lecter.

While Lecter and Graham work to unravel the mystery and catch the killer, Dr. Lecter tests him every step of the way, toying with Graham, playing a game all his own. Like only Lecter can, he twists Will’s mind, daring him to question everything he knows about others – and even more frightening – himself. The second season opens with Graham in prison, falsely convicted for Lecter’s crimes, while the doctor continues to advise the FBI on cases.

Mondo, the Alamo Drafthouse’s premiere collectible art boutique, presents a new poster created by artist Kevin Tong inspired by NBC’s Hannibal. The screen print measures 24″x36″ and is priced at $45. Available in an edition of 275, each poster is printed by D&L Screenprinting and hand numbered. This poster will be available online at a random time on Thursday, February 13th. Follow Mondo New on Twitter for the on sale announcement.

Top 40 Godzilla 2014 Posters

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Top 40 Godzilla 2014 Posters

My favorite Godzilla posters top 40.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

The Warner Brothers panel at the San Diego Comic-Con surprised the audience at Hall H with a sneak peek at WB/Legendary Pictures’ upcoming film, Godzilla, fr…
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When posters attack: the artist being shot at by Hollywood stars

Incredibly bone-headed liberal crap thought:

Head Shots by Jon Burgerman

Head Shots, Jon Burgerman’s photographs of himself being ‘shot’ by actors on film posters, seem wide of the mark. It’s not the movies that kill people: guns do

As the film industry prepares to celebrate its achievements at the Oscars, an artist is offering an alternative take on Hollywoodland in a series of interventions at New York subway stations.

Jon Burgerman poses for photographs in front of the gun-toting stars on violent film posters. With generous dollops of red goo, he looks as if he has been shot in the head by the likes of Jennifer Lawrence and Daniel Craig. In one picture he’s even been hit by an elvish arrow fired from a Hobbit poster.

Burgerman says his “Head Shots” are a protest against the violent imagery put out by Hollywood: “There are quite regular occurrences of gun violence and tragedy around the country, yet we have these celebrated members of society on giant billboards holding weapons”. The photographs are not anything like as gory as they would be in real life – Burgerman’s surreal demonstrations of what it might look like if a movie star shot you from a poster are comic provocations rather than tragic extrapolations. But is his message about the dangerous power of the movies actually true?

America has a catastrophic problem with gun violence. Obama’s failure to get the gun law reform he wanted is the tragedy of his second term. Nor is Burgerman the first to blame Hollywood for helping to shape a lethal gun culture. Jim Carrey refused to publicise Kick-Ass 2 because he found its violence unacceptable after the Sandy Hook murders.

But this is all hopelessly beside the point. America’s gun fans are, I believe, fond of saying that guns don’t kill people, people do. But guns do kill people. They were invented for that purpose. Obviously murder can happen without them but a gun just makes it infinitely easier. Two people arguing without a gun are much less likely to kill each other than if there’s a gun in the house. And it’s obvious that a troubled individual can do far more harm with a gun than without.

It is obscene that such a large and powerful lobby in America refuses to accept these basic logical premises. To blame the film industry is a feeble distraction from the reality that Americans just have too many guns.

Movie posters don’t kill people: guns do. The fear that films promote violence is misconceived because it ignores the nature of art – a representation of the world is not a set of instructions for acting in the world. We are not robots and art cannot programme us.

Art has always dwelt on violence. The first great European poem is Homer’s Iliad, a gory account of the Trojan war: Homer glorifies heroic battle far more explicitly than any film ever would.

Hand Made Vector Halftone Textures for Members

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Access All Areas members may remember the fantastic Emergency Retro Kit that was kindly donated by RetroSupply Co. If you enjoyed that set of resources you’re going to love these latest goodies that have been kindly gifted to members. This VectorSupply pack contains 16 seamless screened halftone vector textures that can be quickly applied as infinite area fills in Illustrator to create awesome aged effects.

RetroSupply resources

RetroSupply Co’s mission is to bring the awesomeness of handmade goods to digital design. Their range of products make it easy for designers to add the craft and tradition of retro design to their work via textures, brushes and actions. Check out the full range in the RetroSupply shop, and receive a free Retrostarter kit by signing up for their newsletter. If you fancy getting your hands of any of the other retro goodies, knock 25% off the price with the special code SPOON2.

RetroSupply Co 25% discount code: SPOOON2

Vector Halftone Textures for Members

VectorSupply Halftone Textures

This set vector halftone textures has been created exclusively for Access All Areas members. It contains 16 premium vector swatches that can be seamlessly tiled to generate infinite areas of distressed halftone screen patterns. Each texture is hand crafted from hours of pulling screens and abusing printers to create the most authentic design resource possible.

RetroSupply Vexture

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How To Create a Grainy B&W High Fashion Photo Effect

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In today’s Photoshop tutorial we’re going to play around with various image adjustments to recreate the emotive style of high fashion black and white photography. Typically these photographs feature many of the characteristics of old school 35mm film, such as heavy film grain and low contrast. Follow this step by step guide to quickly transform your own photos into artistic black and white pieces of art.

High fashion photo effect

The photo effect we’ll be producing is inspired by traditional high fashion photography, as seen in this set of B&W High Fashion Photography on Pinterest. The most obvious characteristic of these photographs is that they’re all black and white, but look closely and you’ll notice that many have low contrast with the blacks not being entirely black (more of a dark grey). These black and white images don’t completely lack colour either, there will often be a very subtle warm or cool tone that adds to the feeling and mood of the shot. We’ll take these common characteristics and replicate them on our modern digital photographs to create a high fasion inspired effect imitating 35mm film.

Grainy B&W High Fashion Photo Effect

We’ll first need an image to edit. A portrait of some kind will work best, but go for something a little conceptual for that abstract high fashion style. This particular image is a beauty portrait from Shutterstock.

The first step towards the black and white high fashion effect is to convert the colour image to monotone. The best way to do this in Photoshop is to use the Black & White adjustment layer to avoid any kind of destructible editing.

The Black & White adjustment layer retains the contrast of the image, unlike a basic desaturation filter. You can also make some adjustments to fine tune the tonal balance. The Default settings may be satisfactory, but presets such as Darker might help create a moodier image.

One of the key characteristics of those high fashion images was the low contrast. Add a Levels adjustment layer in Photoshop then move the black handle from the overall output level inwards to clip the shadows. The whole image will become brighter because the darkest areas are being lost, so use the usual Levels adjustments below the histogram to darken the shadows, brighten the highlights and adjust the midtones to find a balanced range of tones.

Select New Layer from the fly-out menu at the top corner of the Layers palette. Name the new layer Film Grain and set the Mode to Overlay. Check the option to fill the layer with 50% gray.

We’ve used non-destructive adjustment layers so far, let’s make sure that our film grain effects can also be edited or removed later. Right click and convert this Film Grain layer into a Smart Object.

Go to Filter > Noise > Add Noise to add some grain to the image. Change the settings to Monochromatic, Uniform and alter the amount to between 10-15%.

Photoshop noise looks a little fake with it being so perfectly crisp, so add a very subtle 0.5px Gaussian Blur to take the edge off the noise and create a slightly more realistic film grain effect.

Alter the opacity of the Film Grain layer to fine tune the impact of the noise. It should add to the mood of the image but not be too intrusive.

Add a Curves adjustment layer and change the channel selection to Red. Drag the curve line to add a slight positive bend to increase the warmth of the image.

Change the channel selection to Blue and drag the curve in the opposite direction to produce a negative bend, resulting in sepia style tones.

Adjust the opacity of the Curves layer to reduce the impact of the colour adjustment just enough so the image still seems black and white, but the warmth of the sepia tones make a subtle difference.

The final photo effect definitely has more emotion and mood than the original colour photograph, all thanks to the black and white contrast, film grain effect and subtle sepia tones. All the image needs is the addition of a logo for a top perfume, jewellery or fashion brand to make it the perfect full page magazine ad!

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