Just Grabbed Myself These Awesome New Fonts!

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Designers can never have enough fonts! If you’ve ever splashed out on premium fonts before you’ll know just how much better in quality they tend to be than the run of the mill freebies you find on the web. No ugly paths when you look up close and no horrendous kerning issues! The trouble is these pro grade fonts are usually so high in price it’s difficult to acquire a decent collection. However, there’s currently a bundle of beautiful professional fonts on offer for 94% off at Design Cuts. Take this opportunity to grab yourself some complete font-families for just $ 24.

Achille (Complete Font Family)

Achille is a lovely slab serif combining chunky headlines with elegant body text. The subtle curves really make this one stand out from your typical blocky slab typeface. This font comes in 4 weights and even includes a licensed web variant.

Achille font preview

Leano (Complete Font Family)

Leano is an fun curvy font available in 5 weights. It’s full of character and would be a great candidate to consider when creating artistic headlines.

Leano font preview

Booster

Booster is a clean sans-serif with round cap lines. It works great in large scales for use in logos and identity designs, but the web variant is also right at home when used for small body text.

Booster font preview

Bonus: Lullaby Type Vector

Lullaby is an usual typographic resource. It isn’t an actual font where you type out the letters, instead it’s a vector file where you can select, copy & paste the letters into your own projects. This is perfect for creating typographic designs where the first step would be to outline an existing font anyway. The vector paths give you complete control over the shape, so it’s great for custom type or lettering designs.

Lullaby font preview

Professional Font Bundle for 94% Off

This fantastic font bundle from Font You contains these 3 font families with tons of variants, extra characters and vector bonuses. The retail total of these fonts weighs in at $ 390, but as part of this limited time bundle from Design Cuts you can get the whole lot for just $ 24 (that Lullaby bonus is $ 25 alone!). I’ve already added these to my own font library and I can’t wait to find a project to make use of them!

Buy the Professional Font Bundle (94% off)

The post Just Grabbed Myself These Awesome New Fonts! appeared first on Blog.SpoonGraphics.

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7 Beginner Mistakes to Avoid When Designing for Print

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Designing for print can be a minefield for beginners. There’s so many easy mistakes to make that can have a serious impact on the quality of your final prints. With print runs also being very expensive, these mistakes can prove very costly. Hopefully today’s discussion about common beginner mistakes to avoid will help prepare you with the crucial knowledge required to correctly set up a design for print.

Know the difference between RGB & CMYK

RGB CMYK Difference

The most obvious mistake that newcomers fall victim to is the misuse of RGB and CMYK colour modes. RGB (red, green & blue) is an additive colour system where light is used to mix colours; the more light you add the brighter and more vibrant the colour gets. When working on digital designs you’ll often be working in RGB mode because that’s how your monitor works, but the problem arises when we’re creating a design for print using a RGB based tool.

CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow & black (key)) is a subtractive colour system where inks are mixed to create a range of different hues, much like mixing paint as a traditional artist. The more ink you mix the darker the colour gets. The spectrum of colours that can be produced by light is much wider than the range achievable by ink, so our design applications have a special CMYK mode to limit the “gamut” of the colours we have available when creating a design that will ultimately be printed.

Failing to select the CMYK colour mode and instead creating your designs in RGB may result in you selecting awesome colours that just can’t be reproduced in print (without special inks). If you don’t realise this early on you’re going to be in for a surprise when your prints come back all dull and muted.

Watch your CMYK color values

High CMYK colour values

We’ve already talked about how the typical CMYK color model gets darker as you add more ink. In the printing process this is done using an offset lithographic printing press (or a digital printer for small runs). This machine lays down a coverage of the four inks of cyan, magenta, yellow and black over the same area of paper to overlay the inks and create a much wider range of colours. Tiny halftone screens determine how much ink from each plate is applied across the print.

In our design applications we can easily select colours using the color picker tool as well as ready made swatches and adjustable sliders for the C, M, Y & K values. You must keep in mind that colours that use large amounts of cyan, magenta, yellow and black will quickly become oversaturated and any total values containing over 280% coverage may result in ugly muddy colours and set-off (when the ink remains wet and transfers from one sheet to another). Our computer applications might show the colour looking fine on screen, but in reality prints always appear darker than your original design.

Fuzzy text

Using mixtures of multiple inks will also result in potential fuzziness, especially when applied to fine artwork such as text. If those four C, M, Y & K plates are just slightly misaligned (known as registration), your text will appear blurry and difficult to read. Perfectly sharp text can be created by using just one process colour value, so 100% K (black) will be as crisp as you can possibly get.

Don’t use Photoshop black

Different types of black

Open Photoshop and hit the D key to reset the foreground and background colours to their default values. Select the black that has been generated for you, it looks… black, right? Now look at the CMYK values that colours is made from, you’ll find 75% cyan, 68% magenta, 67% yellow and 90% black (300% total coverage). This is a lot of ink to put down on paper. Always manually set your black appropriately. This could be 0,0,0,100 for that crisp black for text, however this doesn’t look great when used as a background colour with it looking more like a dark grey than black. Instead you might opt for a “rich black”, of which there’s many recommendations, but 50,40,40,100 is a popular choice. This addition of other colours darkens the black to provide a much deeper colour, but it’s still well within the coverage limit.

Read more about designing with black

Keep an eye on your font and line weights

Small font sizes don't print well

Those halftone screens in the printing press do a great job of controlling how much ink is placed onto the paper. They work by simply using a lower density of tiny dots in areas that don’t need much coverage. The trouble is you also lose detail when you try going too small, so tiny text and fine hairlines in your artwork are the first elements to become illegible. A limit of 6pt text size is the rule of thumb, but it all depends on the style of your typeface. Helvetica Ultra Light will probably disappear at much larger sizes due to its super fine lines! Keep this in mind when setting any small print within your designs.

Set the correct resolution

Setting 300ppi resolution

On your computer the resolution only really alters how large your image physically looks on screen, whereas in print resolution determines how sharp and crisp your designs will appear. 72ppi is the usual figure for web images, but in print 300ppi is the standard. The more dots or pixels you can put in every inch the more detail the overall image will retain when the image is reproduced in ink.

Make sure all your artwork is created at 300ppi, that includes all images and photography. If you happen to throw in a 72ppi image into your 300ppi working document it will appear tiny because it will be resized accordingly. You’re going to need massive images to fill most documents at 300ppi, so random images from the web just aren’t going to cut it.

You can’t scale a design up in resolution, so make sure you set the document size correctly to begin with to avoid having to start from scratch.

Read more about image resolutions

Don’t forget the bleed

Print document bleed

Resolution isn’t the only crucial factor when setting up a print design layout. You’ll also need to remember to accommodate for bleed. Bleed is an extra margin around the edge of your design where any background elements that touch the edge of the page are extended slightly. This allows for slight inaccuracies when the printed sheet is trimmed to size, so cutting through that buffer of colour will avoid leaving any thin white strips of paper along the edge of your print.

The actual amount of bleed you require will differ between print supplier and project, so be sure to select a printer beforehand and acquire their specs.

Learn how to set bleed in your print designs

Kern, proofread and spell check

Business card spelling mistake (fake)

Typos suck! Despite proofreading this blog post there’s probably a couple of errors that still slipped past me. Fixing mistakes is easy on the web, but imagine how devastating it would be if you take delivery of your 5000 prints only to find a glaring error staring right back at you on every single one! Mistakes in print can’t be rectified, so take your time to check for ugly kerning, misuse of em/en dashes, curly quotes and the usual there/their/they’re errors that aren’t picked up by spell check. The image above is fake by the way… That would have sucked big time!

The post 7 Beginner Mistakes to Avoid When Designing for Print appeared first on Blog.SpoonGraphics.

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10 Free Retro Style Photo Effect Photoshop Actions

retrofilters-preview

I’ve been busy playing around with various photo effects once again to produce another free pack of retro style Photoshop Actions. This latest set named RetroFilters contains 10 preconfigured Action files that will dramatically transform your photos with retro style effects inspired by classic 35mm film and processing techniques.

RetroFilters photo effect actions

How to use Photoshop Actions

How to load Photoshop Actions

Actions are small plugin files for Adobe Photoshop. They’re preconfigured recordings of a sequence of manipulations which are automatically applied to your own images with just a single mouse click. Download this set of RetroFilters and unzip the package to find the enclosed .atn file. Open the Actions window in Photoshop and select the Load Actions option from the fly-out menu.

How to apply Photoshop Actions

Select the name of the Action you would like to apply to your image and click the triangular Play button at the bottom of the Actions window. A series of non-destructive adjustments will be quickly deployed then grouped into a separate folder, which can be deleted to remove the effect.

How to adjust Photoshop Action effect

Fine tune the impact of the effect by adjusting the opacity of the Group, or explore the preset settings to alter the individual adjustments.

Download the RetroFilters Photo Effect Pack

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Blog.SpoonGraphics

30 Beautiful Hand Lettering Typography Illustrations

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Once style of typography that really inspires me is hand lettering that is manipulated to form a complete illustration. These hand crafted pieces of art blend typographic content with illustrated elements to reinforce a message. Being hand drawn means they’re full of character with plenty of irregularities and text that is squashed and stretched into place. This showcase features 30 beatiful examples of these inspiring hand lettering typography illustrations from various talented artists.

Whisky Label by Adam Trageser

Whisky Label by Adam Trageser

King kroach by IZOXXX

King kroach by IZOXXX

Superbowl XLVIII by Joshua Noom

Superbowl XLVIII by Joshua Noom

American Proud by Jeremy Teff

American Proud by Jeremy Teff

Hermit Iceberg by Mary Kate McDevitt

Hermit Iceberg by Mary Kate McDevitt

Cat Ads by Megan Strandell

Cat Ads by Megan Strandell

Work Really Hard by Zachary Smith

Work Really Hard by Zachary Smith

TWTH Atelier by BMD Design

TWTH Atelier by BMD Design

Ride 100% by BMD Design

Ride 100% by BMD Design

DePalma Clothing by BMD Design

DePalma Clothing by BMD Design

Engine Block by BMD Design

Engine Block by BMD Design

Create in California by Kyle Marks

Create in California by Kyle Marks

Original Makers Club by Jon Contino

Original Makers Club by Jon Contino

Steve Desert Race 1963 by TWEED

Steve Desert Race 1963 by TWEED

Lord Fairfax by TWEED

Lord Fairfax by TWEED

Jack Daniel’s Holiday by Joel Felix

Jack Daniel's Holiday by Joel Felix

Theodore Roosevelt by Ryan McArthur

Theodore Roosevelt by Ryan McArthur

Abraham Lincoln by Ryan McArthur

Abraham Lincoln by Ryan McArthur

Whiskey is Liquid Sunshine by Nate Azark

Whiskey is Liquid Sunshine by Nate Azark

Cake by Steph Says Hello

Cake by Steph Says Hello

Little Miss Muffet by Steph Says Hello

Little Miss Muffet by Steph Says Hello

Pussy Cat Pussy Cat by Steph Says Hello

Pussy Cat Pussy Cat by Steph Says Hello

We Are Vegabonds by Jon Contino

We Are Vegabonds by Jon Contino

CXXVI Clothing Co. by Jon Contino

CXXVI Clothing by Jon Contino

CXXVI Clothing Co. by Jon Contino

CXXVI Clothing Co. by Jon Contino

CXXVI Clothing Co. by Jon Contino

CXXVI Clothing Co. by Jon Contino

Find Your Greatness by Noel Shiveley

Find Your Greatness by Noel Shiveley

Waitrose Love Life by Linzie Hunter

Waitrose Love Life by Linzie Hunter

Everyday with Rachael Ray by Linzie Hunter

Everyday with Rachael Ray by Linzie Hunter

Philadelphia Motor Works by Adam Trageser

Philadelphia Motor Works by Adam Trageser

The post 30 Beautiful Hand Lettering Typography Illustrations appeared first on Blog.SpoonGraphics.

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Gorgeous Vintage Posters from the Golden Age of Skiing

theartofskiing

A rare marriage of sports and fashion through mid-century graphic design.

As a devotee of winter sports, both as a lifelong practitioner and an Olympic spectator, and lover of vintage graphic design, especially mid-century travel posters, I was delighted to chance upon The Art of Skiing: Vintage Posters from the Golden Age of Winter Sport (public library) — a remarkable collection of 800 vintage posters and paintings from the first half of the twentieth century when skiing, a sport that immigrant Scandinavian gold miners had introduced to America during the Gold Rush a century earlier, first took the world by blizzard as a fashionable modern sport. Curated by vintage ephemera enthusiast Jenny de Gex, these gorgeous and graphically striking posters were obsessively and lovingly amassed over a lifetime by Mason Beekley, owner of the world’s largest private collection of ski art. They are currently housed at the Mammoth Ski Museum in — surprisingly — California.

For a wholly different application of a similar vintage aesthetic, pair The Art of Skiing with these lovely vintage posters for libraries and reading.

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New Cool Poster Art 2014

 

Great new rare art posters for sale:

 

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Gallus, Grand Vin Apertif
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Dormeuse, c.1932
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Toscano Valley I
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1940 Coupe Salt Flat Racer
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Poppies
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Tour Ireland Connemira Mg…
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Tour Ireland Connemira Mg…
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Frank Lloyd Wright, Falli…
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Wright Brothers Flight at Kitty Hawk
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Window to the Soul
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Pin-Up Girl: Hot Rod Leopard
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Orange Orchid
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The Night Scotsman
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Grand Prix Automobile Mee…
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Sun Salutation II
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Modiano
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Dormeuse, c.1932
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Tulip Fields at Sasenheim
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The Break of Dawn I
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Portrait of Adele Bloch-B…
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True Detective Posters from Mondo (Onsale Info)

Mondo will release a batch of posters for the new HBO show, True Detective, later today. The info for each is listed below. These go up today (Friday, February 14th) at a random time. Visit Mondotees.com.

Phantom City Creative

18″ x 24″ Screenprint, Edition of 220, $ 45:

Phantom City Creative

Vania Zouravliov

24″ x 36″ Screenprint, Edition of 170 (each colorway), $ 50 each:

Vania

Vania

Jay Shaw

18″ x 24″ Screenprint, Edition of 120 (each version), $ 40 each:

Jay Shaw

Jay Shaw


OMG Posters!